Notes on a culture: drama

First, I’m throwing out the window with the proclamation that I don’t like drama. When you’re apart of society. Society is going to happen. When there is a bunch of people in a space, and everyone implies they’re right because of subjection matters.  Chaos is naturally going to ensue.

 

Chaos brings drama like the plague.

It invades the workplace and

sullies school concentration.

Drama acts on behalf of calm rationale.

Destroying recognized peace like rude family members with loud opinions during the holidays.

Drama is hypersensitive.

Social Media is the new shadow to drama.

Social Media drama is a spectrum of functionality depending on what side you’re on. It’s fun to scroll down the lines. Everyone loves a good, well-doxxed call outpost until we are on the side of our information getting plastered for the world to see for the sake of accountability. Only then it’s invasive bullying. Only then, it’s unnecessary dramatics that doesn’t have any bearing in “real life.” This real life where we are attached to our devices. The cognizant function that took place in order to make a social media presence is—there is a space—I don’t know how that is not a part of real life.

Many of us say we foster environments for open dialogue. This goes as far as the “open dialogue” meets our comfort level. As soon someone is offended and defend themselves, they are chastised, while labeled as being overly dramatic; usually by ones holding most insections of privilege. Speaking out is celebrated, only when the vast majority agrees with the message. We only like callout post concerning people we don’t like or not on our level of thinking. When it is someone we like, we meet the post with the bias that the writer is not being fair.

 

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2 Comments

  1. This is also why every time I read things now, I’m also questioning the motive and prospects folks may gain.

    I got into online SJ spaces years ago and connected with intent, active grassroots collectives who actually did stuff—many of whom have faded out, passed away, or just disengaged in the wake of SJ celebs whose cult followings resigned them further to obscurity.

    Back then, the new kids on the block were keen to sell and got SJ savvy so they could amass, monetize, and weaponize social capital.

    The folks about that life didn’t and still don’t take them seriously, but they ultimately undermined every cause; because, it reflects on the overall community when the majority are more inclined to uplift and invest in hucksters whom hijack narratives or [as Phoenix Calida said yesterday] glamorize performative outrage—as opposed to supporting the folks whom actually do the work, are on the ground, about that life minus the SEO, hashtags, or filters.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I got into online SJ spaces years ago and connected with intent, active grassroots collectives who actually did stuff—many of whom have faded out, passed away, or just disengaged in the wake of SJ celebs whose cult followings resigned them further to obscurity.

    The folks about that life didn’t and still don’t take them seriously, but they ultimately undermined every cause; because, it reflects on the overall community when the majority are more inclined to uplift and invest in hucksters whom hijack narratives or [as Phoenix Calida said yesterday] glamorize performative outrage—as opposed to supporting the folks whom actually do the work, are on the ground, about that life minus the SEO, hashtags, or filters.

    Liked by 1 person

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